How Many Disneyland Records Were 78s?


SeaCastle

Playlist Author
I recently got my hands on a Dual 510 turntable, and I hope to start digitizing my records soon using iMic. So far I've found a Jungle Book record, which is a 45. The Dual 510 plays 33s and 45s, but I'm wondering how many (if any) Disneyland records are 78s. (My turntable can't play 78s.)

Thanks in advance!
 
I recently got my hands on a Dual 510 turntable, and I hope to start digitizing my records soon using iMic. So far I've found a Jungle Book record, which is a 45. The Dual 510 plays 33s and 45s, but I'm wondering how many (if any) Disneyland records are 78s. (My turntable can't play 78s.)

Thanks in advance!

Hi SeaCastle!

During the early years of Disneyland records (say 1955-1963) many of the 7 inch singles where released in both formats (78,45). Even though they look simular you can check the label or sleeve (If it still has one :) for the speed.

And before Disneyland records was a label, the majority of Disney related releases were 78s.

If you find some 78s, you could play them on your Dual and then convert them with recording software. I use Audacity which has buttons to use for converting. Not sure if iMic have this function? Fortunately, I have a player that plays 78s,45s and 33 that I can record from so I seldom do converting other than to compensate for an old belt.

Happy Hunting!
 

eyore

DLRP explorer
Premium Member
Playlist Author
I don't have a copy but there is a book that records most of the records (sorry :lol: ) made by Disney.
http://www.abebooks.com/9780930625702/Gold...-0930625706/plp
at $20, that may be worth getting.
I know I have seen it on ebay as well.
Mind you, I'll be surprised if neither of you already have a copy

Image1.jpg
 

FoxxFur

Member
One of the problems with playing 78s is that you'll need a special needle. A 78 RPM record is usually ten inches across (rather than seven) and made of a heavier substance. They will break easily, so be careful. If you play a 78 RPM record with a regular modern microgroove stylus, you will wear your stylus out after repeated use pretty quickly. 78s used a steel needle, and the difference between them in something like this:

Modern stylus in a microgroove record: ===> \V/
Modern stylus in a 78 record groove: ====> \_V_/

So not only will you not hear the proper audio reproduction a 78 record is capable of with a microgroove stylus, but you'll obviously damage any microgroove record you have if you play it with a 78 needle. I have a lot of 78s and am gonna need to invest in a dedicated 78 player since you just junk up your microgroove needle playing those things...
 

eyore

DLRP explorer
Premium Member
Playlist Author
One of the problems with playing 78s is that you'll need a special needle. A 78 RPM record is usually ten inches across (rather than seven) and made of a heavier substance. They will break easily, so be careful. If you play a 78 RPM record with a regular modern microgroove stylus, you will wear your stylus out after repeated use pretty quickly. 78s used a steel needle, and the difference between them in something like this:

Modern stylus in a microgroove record: ===> \V/
Modern stylus in a 78 record groove: ====> \_V_/

So not only will you not hear the proper audio reproduction a 78 record is capable of with a microgroove stylus, but you'll obviously damage any microgroove record you have if you play it with a 78 needle. I have a lot of 78s and am gonna need to invest in a dedicated 78 player since you just junk up your microgroove needle playing those things...

But do remember that the quality of a 78 will be very poor compared to microgroove records so you probably won't notice much of a difference quality wise unless the 78 is brand new. The needles used to play 78s were either steel or porcupine quill (for wind-up ones) the latter being worn out fater but doing less damage. When sapphire styli came out, the ones for 78's were wider than those for 45s and LPs.
The sound reproduction systems up to the early 50's were just a horn - no electrics at all so quality wasn't as important.
I'm lucky. I'm old enough to remember getting a choice between 45's and 78's in the stores :D
I still have my record deck from the 70's which has two needles and speeds of 78, 45, 33 1/3 and 16 which I still use for this purpose (transferring to PC).
Foxxfur is quite right with the warning DO NOT PLAY 45s OR LPs WITH THE SAME NEEDLE unless you want a supply of coasters and, if you get a 78 needle, it'll tear your vinyl to bits because it's way to wide and will shear off the sides of the grooves (you get nice thin shavings of vinyl coming off. I've done that by accident - not good).
However, take my word for it, a modern stylus doesn't wear out that quickly. The shellac of the older 78's is hard but not as hard as the diamond tip of the needle. (Actually, it's not shellac at all - see http://www.shellac.org/recording/record5.html ). Later 78's were made as "Unbreakable" and are nearer to the materials used later (used late 50's).
Where the problems arise is when the older record's grooves have been chipped and pitted by the steel needles. It's the chips that can shear off a diamond tip.
It would be better if you could get a 50's player (like a dancette) and rig the speaker to a jack plug as they were fitted with wider needles (mono). A search around the junk shops will find one.
I'm very wary of adverts that say their player can play 78's and only have one needle (they mean the later 78's).
My other suggestion would be as makeminemusic suggests and record at the lower speed and convert. It really works - and have two separate needles (or cartridge) and label them.
If you are dealing with the later 78's (late 50's onwards) that are slightly flexible and not the hard, black ones, these problems shouldn't arise. Just play them as you would any record. No need for a second needle as the material is very similar to the modern stuff.
That's one of the benefits of being rather old. First hand experience with today's antiques :lol:
 

FoxxFur

Member
I think it all depends on the age of the 78 and the player. I've heard a 1912 78 on an Edison and it sounded fantastic... please note I don't mean "Randy Thorton brings us nectar of the gods using zeros and ones" fantastic, but "people in 1912 shout into a hole in the wall" fantastic. As the era gets more recent the quality improves... I have a great condition Spike Jones 78 of "Der Fuerer's Face" that I think sounds lovely, even using my lame little modern stereo tabletop unit with its' plastic needle. It ain't music if it hasn't got some analog hiss behind it. ;) New records don't even have that... give me dragging a stylus through a groove on a huge slab of synthetic stuff any day of the week!

...That probably came off as sarcasm, but it's my honest to goodness opinion. I want Disney Parks vinyl reissues! Where's Randy..? :angry:
 

Top