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Question for Randy

Discussion in 'Archive' started by Bill, Sep 26, 2002.

  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    I've noticed that there have been alot of "homemade" mixes of attractions floating around the internet. It started me thinking about the procedure you go through in creating an official "ride-thru". Do you have a "live" track as a guide? How do you decide how long each individual element lasts? Do you make an attempt to have your mix match the time of the ride? How do you make decisions about the stereo separation?

    Are these trade secrets?! Can you answer them?

    Thanks,

    Bill
     
  2. Randy Thornton

    Randy Thornton Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2002
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    I actually prefer to create these tracks musically. My edits and additions are determined by the music itself.

    As I?m sure you?re aware, the music for most of these attractions are composed and recorded as ?Loops? (music cues usually one minute in length to play over and over). When you go through the attraction, it is designed that you are not in one place long enough to hear the loop end and start again. I like to use the entire loop (for it has a beginning and an ending) as a complete phrase. I believe you get more music that way. For example, you may have to go through an attraction several times before you hear all of the loop, and then only bits and pieces.

    A good example for using the entire loop is what I did on "It?s a Small World Holiday". I used every loop from beginning to end so that you can hear the entire verse. That is why the track is over 15 minutes long. Obviously, the attraction is that long, but the music really is. The same is true for both versions of "Splash Mountain". Usually, you?re onto the next scene before the music ends in the previous scene ? the music from one ?moves away? as the next ?moves closer?. It works for the attraction because the music is only part of the experience. For the albums, to fade-in or fade-out in the middle of a loop (though that may happen in the attraction) doesn?t sound good when the music is all there is to experience (as on the CD). Is it the most accurate way to represent the physical experience of the attraction itself ? no. But I believe that this technique provides the best musical experience ? which is my focus on the Official Albums (when I get to do them).

    Hope that answers your question.

    Randy
     

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