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gov to destroy your pc if you have illegal MP3s!!!

Discussion in 'Archive' started by dws warzone, Jun 18, 2003.

  1. dws warzone

    dws warzone Member

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    I know this is a little of topic.

    Senator Takes Aim at Illegal Downloads

    Jun 18, 4:29 AM (ET)

    By TED BRIDIS

    WASHINGTON (AP) - Illegally download copyright music from the Internet once, or even twice, and you get a warning. Do it a third time, and your computer gets destroyed.

    That's the suggestion made by the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee at a Tuesday hearing on copyright abuse, reflecting a growing frustration in Congress over failure of the technology and entertainment industries to protect copyrights in a digital age.

    The surprise statement by Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, that he favors developing technology to remotely destroy computers used for illegal downloads represents a dramatic escalation in the increasingly contentious rhetoric over pirated music.

    During a discussion of methods to frustrate computer users who illegally exchange music and movie files over the Internet, Hatch asked technology executives about ways to damage computers involved in such file trading. Legal experts have said any such attack would violate federal anti-hacking laws.


    "No one is interested in destroying anyone's computer," replied Randy Saaf of MediaDefender Inc., a secretive Los Angeles company that builds technology to deliberately download pirated material very slowly so other users can't.

    "I'm interested," Hatch interrupted. He said damaging someone's computer "may be the only way you can teach somebody about copyrights."

    The senator, a composer who earned $18,000 last year in song-writing royalties, acknowledged Congress would have to enact an exemption for copyright owners from liability for damaging computers. He endorsed technology that would twice warn a computer user about illegal online behavior, "then destroy their computer."

    "If we can find some way to do this without destroying their machines, we'd be interested in hearing about that," Hatch said. "If that's the only way, then I'm all for destroying their machines. If you have a few hundred thousand of those, I think people would realize" the seriousness of their actions.

    "There's no excuse for anyone violating copyright laws," Hatch said.

    Some legal experts suggested Hatch's provocative remarks were more likely intended to compel technology and music executives to work faster toward ways to protect copyrights online than to signal forthcoming legislation.

    "It's just the frustration of those who are looking at enforcing laws that are proving very hard to enforce," said Orin Kerr, a George Washington University law professor and former Justice Department cybercrimes prosecutor.

    Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, the committee's senior Democrat, later said the problem is serious but called Hatch's suggestion too drastic.

    "The rights of copyright holders need to be protected, but some Draconian remedies that have been suggested would create more problems than they would solve," Leahy said in a statement. "We need to work together to find the right answers, and this is not one of them."

    Rep. Rick Boucher, D-Va., urged Hatch to reconsider. Because Hatch is Judiciary chairman, "we all take those views very seriously," he said. But Kerr said Congress was unlikely to approve any bill to enable such remote computer destruction by copyright owners "because innocent users might be wrongly targeted."

    A spokesman for the Recording Industry Association of America, Jonathan Lamy, said Hatch was "apparently making a metaphorical point that if peer-to-peer networks don't take reasonable steps to prevent massive copyright infringement on the systems they create, Congress may be forced to consider stronger measures." The RIAA represents the major music labels.

    The entertainment industry has gradually escalated its fight against Internet file-traders, targeting the most egregious pirates with civil lawsuits. The RIAA recently won a federal court decision making it significantly easier to identify and track consumers - even those hiding behind aliases - using popular Internet file-sharing software.

    ---

    On the Net: Sen. Hatch: http://hatch.senate.gov
     
  2. Gurgitoy2

    Gurgitoy2 Active Member

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    Really! I mean if they can figure out a way to destroy a person's computer for downloading MP3's illegally, then why can't they get some decent intelligence on these terrorist networks, or find Bin Laden and Hussein?

    But then I guess we've got Martha Stewart to worry about, she's a much bigger threat after all.
     
  3. GrizzlyHall

    GrizzlyHall Member

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    As for Disney music, it's really iffy. Having a track someone gave you that you can't find anywhere else is one thing - but downloading CDs currenly on sale? That's understandable.
     
  4. BLM07

    BLM07 Member

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    That guy has plenty of money, he should quit whining.
     
  5. Chris Lang

    Chris Lang Member

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    Maybe the real issue is that the recording industry has been price gouging (raping) us for too long. But of course, it's free enterprise, right? They can charge what they want to, we'll freely pay.

    I'm all for the artists being reimbursed, but I think this can be done without charging $15 for a CD that costs pennies to produce.

    Instead of spending countless millions on producing material that can't be copied (easily), maybe they should concentrate on offering their product at a competitve rate.

    Thank You.
     
  6. X-S Tech

    X-S Tech Active Member

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    This is a bit off the main topic but does anyone else agree with the following? If Disney suddenly put out an EPCOT album, with the original Entrance Loop and lots of other cool stuff that I probably had anyway...I would buy it. I would totally plunk down 20 bucks to own the album that they produced to honor such great music. Even if I already had every song on there. I'd get it for the artwork and the liner notes and just to hear how they arranged everything. Disney doesn't realize the gold mine that they have. I get the impression that they think the reason WDRecords don't sell well is because of all the file sharing and downloading that goes on. As if we are all sitting around watching the download indicator tick away as the latest "Oh Mickey Where Art Though" or Jungle Book 2 selection settles onto our harddrive. Perhaps if they took some pride in what they did and actually gave us what we wanted they'd have better business.

    I know that "wrong is wrong" and that what I've said doesn't make it right when the law says otherwise but perhaps in the grand scheme of things it's just a factor that the music industry will have to learn to live with and find some way around.
     
  7. Eric Paddon

    Eric Paddon Member

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    I agree completely that if for instance Disney reversed itself and released the World's Fair set after all, I would buy it despite having all the tracks now because the liner notes and display case would be great, and also an official release is guaranteed to be the best in terms of remastered quality.
     
  8. BLM07

    BLM07 Member

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    And not only that, I don't think the artists today are making as good music as it used to be. Also it wouldn't heart to stop making music videos that cost millions.
     
  9. BLM07

    BLM07 Member

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    I've heard that Disney does know that they know people want the music, but its not high on the priority list. Also royalties cost ALOT for some of the material.
     
  10. Steve LeVine

    Steve LeVine Member

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    I would definitely buy something that was never released before because the quality would almost always be better plus I would want to support the release of rare things.

    Like many people I have downloaded my share of stuff over the years but when it comes to disney I usually only grab what I cant still buy. My views have changed some over the last few years on downloading music.

    I have seen many local record stores go out of business due to dead sales. Yes CD prices have been too high for years but they have been coming down some lately. The scary thing to me is after reading hundreds of posts in many different email groups and message boards it is obvious that most people under age 25 do not even consider buying music anymore. They 100% believe there is no reason they should and they think all musicians are millionaires. I dont know what the answer is but that is the age group that is really hurting the music industry.

    I think what apple has done with their new music download site is a great idea and is pretty much what I have looked for in an online service. I want the opportunity to download certain songs without buying full cds or get songs that might not even be available on cd yet and hopefully that will happen in the future.
     
  11. SharonKurland

    SharonKurland Active Member

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    If they want to try to stop illegal downloading that way, I suppose there's nothing stopping them. However I also believe there are enough hackers out there who would be able to figure out a way around it in such a short period of time that it wouldn't be an issue anyway.

    My MP3 collection started out as songs I had on 45's when I no longer had a record player. Yes, my list of songs has grown considerably since then, but it's NOTHING that I would EVER consider buying. For example, I think I like 3 Aaron Carter songs. Possibly 4. And in my mind, the rest is all junk. To get that small handful of songs on CD, I'd have to buy 2 CDs, fork over $40 and be stuck with 20 or more songs that do not interest me at all. If I coudn't get them on MP3, I never would own the songs at all, because I would NEVER consider buying the CDs.

    -Sharon-
     
  12. BLM07

    BLM07 Member

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    I WILL eventually buy CDs of artists / things I care alot about. As for ripping them, I always rip all of my CDs to mp3 for easy access, also it keeps the CD in good condition.
     
  13. Michael Zielski

    Michael Zielski Member

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    X-S echoes my feelings. If the Walt Disney Company had any genuine interest in the wonderful--and simply historically significant--recordings catalogued in R. Michael Murphy's book of Walt Disney Records, and of course, the various theme park soundtracks over the years, then any internet piracy would be less of an issue--many of us would certainly buy the CD's. But if they keep tossing us scraps like repetitive official albums, and continue to ignore a rich musical heritage that deserves to be heard by current and future generations, then, as we used to say in school--tough.

    Or, as Bill suggested in another recent post, why not just "sub-contract" out the work of releasing some historic musical treasures to someone like the folks at Rhino, who seem to be in the business of resuscitating some great old recordings, especially if Eisner and his minions are too busy trying to figure out more ways to cut corners at the theme parks......I'd better stop......

    Mike
     
  14. X-S Tech

    X-S Tech Active Member

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    Hey Bill you gotta order your new releases from Tower online. Out here in CA and online they're like $13.99 maybe that's just the crap that I like though. But yes it is ironic that you can own the film for less than the soundtrack.

    I suspect a lot of what leaks out of the WDI Sound Archives comes from insiders who know about the demand for these treasures. If Disney established a reputation of giving the public what they wanted before they new they wanted it (in other words keeping up with demand) perhaps the temptation to sneak stuff out covertly would subside. If WDR kept us happy, no one else has too. Mind you I'm not excusing security breaches only suggesting a explanation.


    Have they deemed that the CD copy protection that appeared on the more recent TDSea albums isn't effective enough or something? Why hasn't anyone else tried that sort of thing on a large scale?
     

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