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Disney Bootlegs

Discussion in 'Archive' started by will, Mar 20, 2002.

  1. will

    will Member

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    I know bootlegs are a touchy subject, but I am curious as to know which Disney soundtracks are available only via bootleg. The ones I know for sure are:

    20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
    The Black Cauldron
    The Black Hole
    Something Wicked This Way Comes
    Baby, Secret of the Lost Legend
    The Journey of Natty Gann
    Mulan (expanded from the Academy Promo)

    anyone know of any others?
     
  2. sam253

    sam253 Member

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    There is an official CD release of The Black Cauldron, but since it is out of print, I guess it's fair to say it's available only as a bootleg. I don't mind the fact that the official CD isn't the "actual" soundtrack, because it certainly isn't the only one re-recorded for album release. I think the bootleg version is longer, though.
    I have a CD soundtrack to Splash - it claims to be a "promotional release", but is it still a bootleg or an official one? Does anyone know?
     
  3. Kdroz

    Kdroz New Member

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    would OST xfered from vinyl be considered "bootlegs"??? i just finished xfers of "Pete's Dragon", "Bedknobs & Broomsticks" (even though i know they are both due to be released sooner or later) and "Song of the South" .

    also i know this may sound picky...but i would not consider "out of print" OST's to be be "Bootlegs". the word "bootleg" indicates to me that it was never released before (ie. Promos and such). that's just my opinion. if a OST was once available chances are (with some luck and cash) you can locate it on the secondary market. there are some good websites out there for tracking down that type of stuff.

    thanx for reading my $0.03 (adjusted for inflation). 8)
     
  4. SharonKurland

    SharonKurland Active Member

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    Keith-

    IMHO, yes, making copies of vinyl is considered "bootleg." Years and years ago (more than 10, less than 25), before I was a huge Disney fan, I was a huge Monkees fan. I had a HUMONGOUS audio (500+) and video (125+, SLP speed) tape collection of Monkees appearances and the reason it was so big was because I'd make copies and trade with other fans (at the time, I had one of the largest bootleg Monkees A/V collections in the country). Besides the concerts and the TV and radio appearances, I had several rare Monkee records that I would transfer onto audiotape for people and they were definitely "bootleg" material.

    -Sharon-
     
  5. sds910

    sds910 Member

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    Sharon:

    With all due respect, I'm going to have to correct you on this one. "Bootleg" is a term reserved in the music community for a release of an underground recording - with artwork and design created by the entity that released the product.

    What Keith is referring to -- a copy of a legitimate release, albeit one that's long out of print -- is properly referred to not as a "bootleg", but rather as a "pirate" release.

    Okay, so we're splitting hairs... however, in general -- it's the pirated releases that drive record companies nuts rather than bootlegs... as piracy directly cuts into a record label's profit margin. Bootlegs are generally material that the label would never have issued in the first place (or at least such was the case before the CD boxed set revolution caused record companies to rethink that whole subject).

    Pirated releases, however, are a larger concern for the labels -- think in terms of one-off copies of Britney Spears' latest CD being sold via streetcorner vendors and churned out en masse in a warehouse operation somewhere... rather than a private release of 1000 copies of -- say -- Michael Bolton Live at the Thunderdome -- something that would have far less mass appeal.

    Just my $0.02, your mileage may vary...

    Steve Shorten
     
  6. Kdroz

    Kdroz New Member

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    i suppose that it's a question of symantics but i gotta say that steve has brought up an interesting point. i suppose you can consider the xfers i've done "pirate". now if i massed produced them would they be considered "bootleg" ;D?
     
  7. SharonKurland

    SharonKurland Active Member

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    Hi Steve-

    Yes, you definitely ARE splitting hairs, but I don't mind .

    To be honest, I never paid THAT much attention to the whole "music industry" thing...I was just a lowly little Monkees fan who wanted to hear more stuff. But what you say makes sense and I guess, under those circumstances, I was a pirate and not a bootlegger. It STILL was a pretty impressive collection at the time, WHATEVER you call it .

    -Sharon-
     
  8. Ron Muth

    Ron Muth New Member

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    SteveS is correct. Reproductions of officially released material equals pirate. Circulating otherwise unavailable to the public material means boot.
     
  9. SharonKurland

    SharonKurland Active Member

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    ACTUALLY...as I think about it...SOME of my Monkees collection was pirate and some was bootleg. Not that it matters, since I don't have the collection anymore. But I'm very anal so I just wanted to clarify that small detail .

    And ALL of my Disney collection is "kosher."

    -Sharon-
     
  10. will

    will Member

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    The SPLASH promo isn't a bootleg, since it was manufactured for the composer. They typically are not available to the public, but sometimes manufacturers sell additional copies to recoup the cost (in this case, Super Tracks Music Group). The Intrada label recently sold the promo release of YOUNG SHERLOCK HOLMES, limited to 1000 copies to recoup the cost of manufacturing it for Bruce Broughton. They went extremely fast, and general public buyers were limited to one copy. A few have popped up on ebay, but the auctions were quickly closed, due to copyright issues, since it was not technically an "official" release. The YSH cd's state on the back cover, PRODUCED BY THE COMPOSER FOR PROMOTIONAL USE ONLY. NOT LICENSED FOR SALE. This statement is not found on the SPLASH promo release.
     
  11. Kdroz

    Kdroz New Member

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    ok enough of this talk.....let's get back to the Monkees!!!!

    just kidding.

    call it what you will. you hafta admit it's interesting. i'm always on the prowl for "unreleased" (be it "promo", "pirate", "bootleg" or whatever) material. i guess that's what makes collecting fun (for me anyway). but ya hafta admit that after a while it becomes an obsession. which i'm not saying is bad....
     
  12. sds910

    sds910 Member

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    Sharon:

    Shame you don't have the collection anymore... as it turns out, I'm a Monkees fan too... just don't say it too loud around my readers at The 910... which would explain my credentials on the bootleg/pirate thing... The 910 is an infamous newsletter covering both bootleg & authorized releases by that *other* Fab Four, The Beatles...

    Be that as it may, my personal take on the matter as it applies to the actual topic at hand is that private individuals who have been restoring their old vinyl for their own benefit and that of a few like-minded individuals are probably doing the industry as a whole a favor -- as it makes them aware of a market for a commodity they've undoubtedly forgotten they own and can exploit. Of course, there was chat a few years ago that Disney would be branching out the Disneyland Forever idea over to the Disney Stores with kiosks selling make-your-own discs of classic Disney vinyl titles. Sadly, with Disney and RedDotNet no longer partnered and the Disney Stores going to hell in a handcart, 'twould seem like the project is deader than the Roger Rabbit sequel. Still, I'm sure Randy is at least trying to fan *some* sort of flames over at WDR to revive some of the classic material. In the meantime, I'm all for someone -- ANYONE -- preserving recorded music. It's meant to be heard... not indexed and filed away...
     

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