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Color Significance Of Wonderland CDs

Discussion in 'Archive' started by Jeff, Apr 19, 2004.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Member

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    Hi!

    I have a quick (newbie) question for you experts. I've purchased many of the new Wonderland CDs at Disneyland and they all have a CD spine color that matches the CD disc color (the disc label). While most have different color labels, some have the same color. (ex. Maroon, Green, Blue, Red)

    What is the significance of the colors?

    My guess is that it matches the LPs that were issued, by using the same colors, but since I don't have any LPs, I am unable to compare. If it does match the LPs, is there any significance to the LP colors?

    Much thanks in advance for any insight!
    -Jeff
     
  2. narkspud

    narkspud Member

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    You get a cookie! Different series of albums had different color labels, and the CDs match the label color on the original first pressing of the LP. The attention to this little detail on the CDs is a VERY Disney touch, IMHO, and I think it's neat that they went to the trouble.

    If you can get your hands on Miller's Disney Records book, it details which colors go with which series. If *I* could get *my* hands on it right this second, I'd give you a rundown, but it's packed in a box somewhere waiting for rediscovery like the Lost Ark or something. I can tell you that the two most common colors are purple (the "storyteller" series with the ST- catalog numbers, also the early WDL-3000 series of adult pop releases) and yellow (the budget DQ- series). Red with silver print indicates the celebrated WDL-4000 series, with its spiffy cover art and premium prices. By using primary colored paper with only one shade of print, they saved a wad of money on printing for many years, although the trade-off was a surprisingly ugly label for such a visually-oriented company.

    Also, if you look at Disneyland releases from the mid 50s and Capitol releases from the same period, you'll find that the colors and inks used by the two labels match up remarkably well. Guess whose factory did most of Disneyland's early pressings?

    Buena Vista only used one label design and color at a time. The differences on those indicate only when they were released.
     
  3. Jeff

    Jeff Member

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    Thanks for the prompt reply! Your reply has a wealth of information; I do already have that book, but it is so jam-packed with information, I've been hesitating in reading it. Your information has piqued my curiousity and I'll begin reading it tonight! :) If I remember correctly, the beginning of the book has some text and then it gets into the catalog of all the LPs. I imagine it won't take too long to go through the text of the book.

    Many thanks again!
    -Jeff
     
  4. chris

    chris Member

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    Hi Narkspud,

    I'm remembering when you told us about the difference in different CD-R and DVD-R brands and how some of them eventually may get disc rot. Would you be kind enough to share the info on which ones are a good choice and where I might be able to order them from?

    The thought of having some of my saved information on CD possibly being gone in the future concerns me.

    Much Thanks,
    Chris
     
  5. Tim Hollis

    Tim Hollis Member

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    While on the subject of the Murray book (not Miller, a name with a quite different Disney association...), Greg Ehrbar and I came to a reluctant conclusion regarding our upcoming WALT DISNEY RECORDS STORY. At the risk of seeming like Murray copycats, we are going to have our massive narrative end at the same place Murray finished his cataloging, which is the discontinuation of vinyl records in 1988.

    We have so much to tell, and so many people to honor, from the 1956-1988 period that we just couldn't bear the thought of cutting any of it just to be able to include the post-1988 record history, most of which has been well documented anyway. Hopefully this will enable us to finish by our October deadline.

    Since Murray's introduction was mentioned, I will say again (as I have done elsewhere) that if you take what Murray wrote and imagine expanding it by 300 pages or so, you will have an idea of what our final product will be. And by ending it in 1988, we can probably use the title we originally wanted, THE DISNEYLAND RECORDS STORY, rather than THE WALT DISNEY RECORDS STORY. (Vista Records fans will not be disappointed just because their label didn't make it into the title.. it will be well represented, you can be sure.)

    Now, back to work on it.
     
  6. Tim Hollis

    Tim Hollis Member

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    While on the subject of the Murray book (not Miller, a name with a quite different Disney association...), Greg Ehrbar and I came to a reluctant conclusion regarding our upcoming WALT DISNEY RECORDS STORY. At the risk of seeming like Murray copycats, we are going to have our massive narrative end at the same place Murray finished his cataloging, which is the discontinuation of vinyl records in 1988.

    We have so much to tell, and so many people to honor, from the 1956-1988 period that we just couldn't bear the thought of cutting any of it just to be able to include the post-1988 record history, most of which has been well documented anyway. Hopefully this will enable us to finish by our October deadline.

    Since Murray's introduction was mentioned, I will say again (as I have done elsewhere) that if you take what Murray wrote and imagine expanding it by 300 pages or so, you will have an idea of what our final product will be. And by ending it in 1988, we can probably use the title we originally wanted, THE DISNEYLAND RECORDS STORY, rather than THE WALT DISNEY RECORDS STORY. (Vista Records fans will not be disappointed just because their label didn't make it into the title.. it will be well represented, you can be sure.)

    Now, back to work on it.
     
  7. narkspud

    narkspud Member

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    The magic words are "Made in Japan." The most reliable and most compatible blanks come from the factories located there (including Taiyo Yuden and Mam-A/Mitsui). If the country of manufacture is somewhere other than Japan, there's no guarantee as to who actually made it, and the odds are that it's a cheap generic that may not last the decade.

    My company uses Taiyo Yuden brand blanks exclusively, for both CD-Rs and DVD-Rs. Taiyo Yudens can be had in bulk from many sources online. We've had good luck so far with http://www.rima.com .

    Ordering one of the "major brands" does you little good, since there's no way of knowing who made the disc until you get it. (Well, except that every "Maxell Pro Grade" CD-R I've ever seen has turned out to be a basic Taiyo Yuden--with a hefty markup.) Maxell, Fujifilm, Verbatim and Apple seem to be the brands most likely to repackage the Japanese DVD-Rs lately.

    As for CD-Rs, the Japanese ones are getting tougher to dig up in stores since Fujifilm switched to Taiwanese generics. I noticed the other day that Verbatim is now having theirs manufactured in India. I have no idea what that portends, but I'll stick with the Taiyo Yudens until I am given a good independently verified reason to go elsewhere.

    And yes, for in the car I use the cheapest junk I can get. :)
     
  8. chris

    chris Member

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    Narkspud,

    Thanks so much for the help. I really do appreciate it.

    That company looks like a good source. I'll give them a try.

    Thanks!

    Chris
     
  9. X-S Tech

    X-S Tech Active Member

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    I hate thinking about the day when my CD collection may crumble to dust or just be unplayable. I guess the only solution if you haven't burned onto higher quality discs is just to keep backing up copies every once in a while huh?
     

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